At-Home HIIT Workout

2.19.18 / Comment

Image Source: 123RF

What is HIIT?

You’ve probably heard about it before. This type of workout is becoming extremely trendy due to its physical benefits and added convenience. HIIT stands for High Intensity Interval Training. HIIT is a type of training where you go all-out, 110% effort in quick and intense bursts of an exercise followed by a short, active recovery period. For example, sprinting for 30 seconds as fast as you can followed by a 1 minute walk and then repeating.

HIIT training also induces Excess Post-Oxygen Consumption, EPOC, which means that there is an after-burn effect. EPOC will help you burn more calories even after HIIT is over. Researchers have proven that HIIT improves Cardio-metabolic health [1].

What are the benefits of HIIT?

The reason that HIIT has become so popular is because of its many benefits. Check out some of our favorites below.

1. Increased Metabolism

Adding in weight lifting after HIIT results in EPOC, thus speeding your metabolic rate. This way you’re burning calories long after your workout is over!

2. Convenience

HIIT workouts are quick, making it easier for a quick trip to the gym. Most standard HIIT workouts are 25 minutes or less and the benefits are still there.

3. Zero Equipment

HIIT is a great option to do at home as well since there is no equipment required for a successful session. Most HIIT workouts use only your body weight as most of the focus is on getting your heart rate up.

Below is our At-Home HIIT Workout! This workout consists of 2 circuits that are repeated 3 times each for a total of 18 minutes. This workout can be done at home, at the gym or wherever you have room! All you need is a watch, timer or clock to keep an eye on. Make sure you fully complete each exercise before moving on the the next rep. As always, stretch before and after your workout and make sure you have enough water nearby!

“Results happen over time, not overnight. Work hard, stay consistent and be patient” – Uknown

At-Home HIIT Workout:

Jumping Jacks – 30 seconds

Start with feet shoulder width apart and arms by sides. Jump while raising arms above head and separating feet. Jump back together. Repeat for 30 seconds followed by a 30 second rest.

Image Source: WorkoutLabs

Jump Squats – 30 seconds

Start with feet shoulder width apart and arms by sides. Squat lower body down bending at the knees, making sure knees are never past toes. Squat down, jump body up and twist 180 degrees and repeat for 30 seconds. Follow with a 30 second rest.

Image Source: WorkoutLabs

Mountain Climbers – 30 seconds

Start in push up position. Jump right foot forward then back to starting position. Follow with right foot. Repeat for 30 seconds, followed by a 30 second rest.

Repeat this circuit 3 full times.

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Burpees – 30 seconds

Start in push up position. Carefully jump so feet are flat on the floor, then jump up. Repeat for 30 seconds followed by a 30 second rest.

High Knees – 30 seconds

Begin standing with feet shoulder width apart. Raise one knee up high and begin running in place. Remember to keep knees as high as possible. Continue for 30 seconds followed by a 30 second rest.

Image Source: 123RF

30 Second Walking Lunges

Begin with your feet shoulder width apart and your hands on your hips. Step forward with one leg, dropping your knee almost to the ground but not touching the ground. Keep your posture upright. Bring back leg forward to standing position and repeat with opposite leg. Continue for 30 seconds followed by a 30 second rest.

Repeat this circuit 3 full times.

TOTAL CIRCUIT TIME: 18MIN

Looking to refuel after this workout? We’ve listed some of our favorite post-workout meals below!

Chickpea Salad

Vegan Chunky Monkey Overnight Oats

Spaghetti Squash with Cannellini Beans

Black Bean Egg Muffins

Tamari Freekeh Salad Bowl

Baked Tofu with Thai Style Peanut Sauce

Grilled Chicken Satay with Thai Style Peanut Sauce

Disclaimer: Triad to Wellness employees are not personal trainers or physical therapists. 
Always consult with a physician before beginning exercises and new programs/workouts. 

[1] Shepherd, S. O., Wilson, O. J., Taylor, A. S., Th√łgersen-Ntoumani, C., Adlan, A. M., Wagenmakers, A. J. 
M., & Shaw, C. S. (2015). Low-Volume High-Intensity Interval Training in a Gym Setting Improves 
Cardio-Metabolic and Psychological Health. PLoS ONE, 10(9), e0139056. 
http://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0139056

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